tatsuhissa:

Toudou’s #1 fan confirmed xD

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(Source: fapkins)

oreides:

petition for a roller derby girls sports anime

kateordie:

paulinaganucheau:

♥♥♥UPDATE!♥♥♥

Thank you so much everyone for your interest in the Part-TIme Magical Girl print! Because of all you great people, I decided to open a print shop on Inprnt! They provide gorgeous archival prints in an assortment of sizes! And to those who would rather see prints in person, I will also be debuting an exclusive print version of this at spx in September!

My Magical Arsenal print is also available through them as well!

♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥Shop for prints here♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

And for everyone interested in shirts of the Part-Time Magical Girl design, do not fret! I will have some t-shirt news coming your way very soon! :D :D 

Get these prints, hecka yes!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Types of Shots (And What They Say) part 2.More tips and explanations on what different types of camera shots and angles are used for. Have a great Tuesday, everyone.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Types of Shots (And What They Say) part 2.

More tips and explanations on what different types of camera shots and angles are used for. Have a great Tuesday, everyone.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.

A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)

Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?

I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.

Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - HandsThis is the first post about hands. Other posts about hands in the future will cover “hands in relationship to the body”, “different characters, different hands”, “expressive hands” and “hands touching things”. If you have suggestions for Tuesday Tips, write me a personal message.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Hands

This is the first post about hands. Other posts about hands in the future will cover “hands in relationship to the body”, “different characters, different hands”, “expressive hands” and “hands touching things”. If you have suggestions for Tuesday Tips, write me a personal message.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - More Acting Less AnatomyI’ve received a few message asking me how to draw simple generic characters (male, female) for story boarding, and what to do when there’s no character design. I will go over all that stuff, but I need to emphasize something first. I used to be obsessed with muscles and specific anatomy when I was drawing anything. Thanks to 90s superhero comic books and raging hormones, it kept me from embracing the storytelling aspect of sketching. Even later on in art school, I would spend WAY took much time on getting that perfect line quality. Animation Storyboarding squashed most of those inclinations out of me, and that’s good. I need to confess that I almost caved in and “cleaned up” the drawings on this page. This is how I draw when do a “first pass” or just trying to find ideas. That way, I don’t lose the energy or feel of my first instinct when approaching a sequence. Here’s something you’ll hear many times if you hang around story people: “It’s not about pretty drawings.” I agree and disagree to a certain extent, but the sentiment is right. It’s about telling a story and not letting other things (like lines, musculature, clothing, etc.) get in the way of doing so clearly.Once again, message me if you have requests for the next installments.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - More Acting Less Anatomy

I’ve received a few message asking me how to draw simple generic characters (male, female) for story boarding, and what to do when there’s no character design. I will go over all that stuff, but I need to emphasize something first. I used to be obsessed with muscles and specific anatomy when I was drawing anything. Thanks to 90s superhero comic books and raging hormones, it kept me from embracing the storytelling aspect of sketching. Even later on in art school, I would spend WAY took much time on getting that perfect line quality. Animation Storyboarding squashed most of those inclinations out of me, and that’s good. I need to confess that I almost caved in and “cleaned up” the drawings on this page. This is how I draw when do a “first pass” or just trying to find ideas. That way, I don’t lose the energy or feel of my first instinct when approaching a sequence. Here’s something you’ll hear many times if you hang around story people: “It’s not about pretty drawings.” I agree and disagree to a certain extent, but the sentiment is right. It’s about telling a story and not letting other things (like lines, musculature, clothing, etc.) get in the way of doing so clearly.

Once again, message me if you have requests for the next installments.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tip - Beat Boards / StoryboardsIt can be a daunting task to just “start storyboarding”. Because there’s so many things to think about when storyboarding, we all need a roadmap to know where we are going. Beat boards are not even the first step to creating a story, but it’s often the clearest way to pitch an early concept to someone. It’s also very useful to plan out the larger beats of a large physical sequence (action, chase, etc.). This way, you don’t have to go on a limb for a week or two and have to redo it all if it doesn’t work. They’re sort of like your Key Poses in animation, but put on a story scale. Does that make sense? Message me if you have any questions or suggestions about future posts.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tip - Beat Boards / Storyboards

It can be a daunting task to just “start storyboarding”. Because there’s so many things to think about when storyboarding, we all need a roadmap to know where we are going. Beat boards are not even the first step to creating a story, but it’s often the clearest way to pitch an early concept to someone. It’s also very useful to plan out the larger beats of a large physical sequence (action, chase, etc.). This way, you don’t have to go on a limb for a week or two and have to redo it all if it doesn’t work. They’re sort of like your Key Poses in animation, but put on a story scale. Does that make sense? Message me if you have any questions or suggestions about future posts.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - No Straight LinesCurved lines > Straight lines. That’s it.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - No Straight Lines

Curved lines > Straight lines. That’s it.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - LINE OF ACTION
The line of action doesn’t necessarily need to be drawn in. As long as you think about it while drawing, your gesture or posing will be stronger. It gives a direction to the pose, a force that runs though, or simply a visual pathways to guide your audience. Use it always!Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - LINE OF ACTION

The line of action doesn’t necessarily need to be drawn in. As long as you think about it while drawing, your gesture or posing will be stronger. It gives a direction to the pose, a force that runs though, or simply a visual pathways to guide your audience. Use it always!

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - HairThere’s no hard rules to draw hair (or anything for that matter), but the one thing that I try to keep in my mind is that there’s AIR in hair. I can draw it as a shape because there’s hundreds of thousands of them, but I’m also considering the space between them. For example, the volume of dry hair and wet hair will be dramatically different. Also, the way it behaves will differ greatly from person to person. I mostly think about the “weight” of the hair. Longer hair will means that the mass of hair will be heavier and react accordingly.*As always, leave a message if there’s a topic you would like to see covered.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Hair

There’s no hard rules to draw hair (or anything for that matter), but the one thing that I try to keep in my mind is that there’s AIR in hair. I can draw it as a shape because there’s hundreds of thousands of them, but I’m also considering the space between them. For example, the volume of dry hair and wet hair will be dramatically different. Also, the way it behaves will differ greatly from person to person. I mostly think about the “weight” of the hair. Longer hair will means that the mass of hair will be heavier and react accordingly.

*As always, leave a message if there’s a topic you would like to see covered.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Types of Shots (And What they Say.) Part 1Camera angles and proximity really do convey a lot of information to your audience. Knowingly or unknowingly, your choices affect the viewers. What do you want them to feel or think at a specific moment?Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Types of Shots (And What they Say.) Part 1

Camera angles and proximity really do convey a lot of information to your audience. Knowingly or unknowingly, your choices affect the viewers. What do you want them to feel or think at a specific moment?

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINEOne of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.Normand

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINE

One of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.

Normand